It’s time to start doing

It’s time to start doing. To start writing. To start building. To start learning. I’ve spent far too long collecting resources and ideas, and not nearly enough time in using the resources, or acting on the ideas.

My Dropbox folder is full of files with notes on half-baked projects I could do. The list of “technologies and programming languages I should look in to” has grown to multiple pages. I have days of articles and blog posts queued up on Readability, dozens of technical papers collected, and multiple trees-worth of books sitting on bookshelves in my house, all waiting to by read. Ideas and partial outlines for talks I could give at insert-conference-name-here abound. Wouldn’t it be great to build a side-project or two to gain a bit of passive income? And what about that podcast I’d love to start?

I’ve somehow got myself in to the mindset that if I’m going to do something, then it just to be just right. The subject of a blog post must be ground-breaking; a project posted on GitHub must be fully featured, well-tested and actually working; a talk topic must be one that no one else knows anything about, or it’s not worth it. So I don’t do them, because I know whatever I do won’t be perfect.

But I also know that that’s stupid. I know that it’s far too easy to get left behind in this world of rapidly advancing and changing technology, to get complacent with what’s already known. I know that I learn best when I’m doing, building, writing. To push myself forward will take time and effort. It will more than likely result in dreadful blog posts, code that plain doesn’t work, talks that bomb. Not every step will be forward, but I’ll learn and grow with every one.

So this is the first step. I’ve written something — I didn’t know what it was going to be until I started writing — and posted it. It’s time to start doing.

 
17
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17
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